Archive for the Papillons Around The World category

Papillon “Oliver” wins the Toy Breed at the 2006 AKC/Eukanuba National Championship

Name: CH INVOLO SEEING IS BELIEVING

Catalog No.: 37

Birthdate: 05/07/02

Breed: Papillons

Group: The Toy Group

Call Name: Oliver

AKC Registration No.: TP29417902

Sex: D

Sire: Kvar Pocket Rocket

Dam: Ch Involo Standing Room Only

Breeder(s): Donna G & Michael D Garofalo & J Paulino

Owner(s): M & D Garofalo & E Griffin & D & S Newcomb

Owner’s Address: 1503 Austin Rd
League City, 775730000

Class Competitions:
Best In Show judged by Mrs. Robert S. Forsyth
The Toy Group judged by Mrs. Jane G. Kay
Best of Breed judged by Mr. William Cunningham

Related Entries posted on PetLvr.com – [The Blog]

http://www.petlvr.com/blog/2006/01/dont-miss-the-fifth-annual-akceukanuba-national-championship-january-14-and-15-2006/
http://www.petlvr.com/blog/2006/01/tickets-on-sale-for-a-doggone-good-time-at-the-akceukanuba-national-championship/
http://www.petlvr.com/blog/2006/01/hey-abbott-costello-wins-the-best-in-show/
http://www.petlvr.com/blog/2006/01/akceukanuba-national-championship-update-iams/

Superdogs beg to please


Evan Semon © News

Ear Muffs, a 6-year-old papillon, checks things out at the stock show. Ear Muffs was part of the Superdogs show, which includes events such as barrel races, Frisbee tosses and obstacle courses for dogs.

Rocky Mountain News: Local – Superdogs beg to please

Canines raise the ruff with stunts and skills before loud crowd

Evan Semon © News

Ear Muffs, a 6-year-old papillon, checks things out at the stock show. Ear Muffs was part of the Superdogs show, which includes events such as barrel races, Frisbee tosses and obstacle courses for dogs.

Herb Williams believes there are only three types of people in this world.

“You had a dog, you have a dog or you want a dog,” he said Monday while setting up obstacles for his Superdogs show at the National Western Stock Show. “And if you’re not one of those people, guess what – your uncle had a dog when you were a kid 30 years ago, so you’ve been trained by a dog anyhow.”

Williams, who founded the internationally touring Superdogs in 1976, has made his living serving up the stuff dog lovers devour.

Barrel races. Frisbee tosses. Obstacle courses. All choreographed to fast-paced beats. His second and final Denver show of this tour, which is expected to sell out again to a raucous crowd of dog enthusiasts, starts today at 6:30 p.m.

If you are sensitive to screaming, bring earplugs. The 4,500 fans in the sold-out arena Monday produced a noise louder than anything you’ll ever deal with at Invesco Field.

“There’s no other show in the world where people cheer that loud,” Superdogs co-producer Leonard Chase said.

Much of the cheering was for Pot Roast, a bulldog from New York that spent most of its time trying to knock over or chew every obstacle put in front of it.

Its owner, Joan Weston, is a former professional ice hockey goalie who now trains dogs full time.

“A really good Superdog is a combination of finding out what your dog likes to do and then training within that,” she said.

Williams, a champion show-dog owner, created Superdogs after he became bored with the traditional dog show format.

“After winning 100 Best in Shows, I figured there has to be a way to have fun with dogs other than to have a judge point to your dog in the ring and say, ‘You’re the best,’ ” he said.

As the show went on, Keri Caraher, of Fort Collins, stood behind the black curtain with Morgan, her 6-year-old Great Dane.

Morgan was one of four metro-area dogs recruited to “try out” for the traveling extravaganza while it was at the stock show. The dogs had never been in such a loud arena.

“We’re extremely nervous because we have no idea what we’re going to do,” Caraher said.

Spontaneity is a big part of the Superdogs show. For each engagement, Williams pulls a couple dozen pooches from a pool of 150 dogs that are on standby to volunteer their time for the adrenaline-filled event.

For “Woof Stock,” as Williams named his Denver shows, the dogs came from California, Calgary, Denver and many cities in-between. Breeds included a German shepherd, a pug, a poodle, a Labrador retriever, a Burmese mountain dog and three border collies.

Half the dogs were rescued by a humane society, Williams said. So making the cut as a Superdog has little to do with pedigree and a lot to do with personality. Whether they’re pound puppies or regal beagles, successful Superdogs have a magnetism for people.

So do the owners, each of whom volunteers his or her time. The producers pay their way and put them all up in a dog-friendly hotel.

Dianne McWhinnie, whose border collie, Nexus, may well be the fastest in the show, has toured with Superdogs for about 16 years. She said she returns year after year for the camaraderie among dog owners.

“The type that winds up with Superdogs is always fun and outgoing and boisterous,” she said. “For me it’s like a reunion.”

In the hospitality room after Monday’s show, Williams told the Superdog owners that some special guests were in the audience. Some dog trainer friends of his had come to the show with a pair of chow puppies, which were frozen test tube descendants of Williams’ long-since dead champion chow.

“They said, ‘Obviously you’ve not lost the magic that you have put on every dog you’re ever with,’ ” he said.

He thanked everyone who came for a great show.

“To have all these things just sort of come together today was really good,” he said.

If you go

• What: Superdogs.

• When: 6:30 p.m. today.

• Where: Events Center.

• Tickets: $12 (includes gate admission)

• Information: call 303-295-6124

bargec@RockyMountainNews.com or 303-892-5059

2005 © The E.W. Scripps Co.

Follow-up on Finnegan, the orphaned squirrel

This is a follow-up to a post October 19, 2005 …. “What A Good Mommy I Am” …

OregonLive.com: NewsFlash – Once nursed among pups, squirrel moves on after one last visit

12/27/2005, 3:31 p.m. PT
The Associated Press

SEATTLE (AP) — Finnegan, the orphaned squirrel, has found a new family. But he didn’t go in a hurry.

In early September, when he was a newborn, animal lover Debby Cantlon started caring for Finnegan after fielding a call from someone who found him near a tree in a south Seattle suburb. His eyes hadn’t even opened yet.

He got famous after television cameras captured images of Cantlon’s dog, a Papillon with long-haired butterfly ears, letting him nurse alongside her pups.

When Finnegan was 8 weeks old, Cantlon decided it was time for him to return to the outdoors and started letting him outside.

At first, he ran around but would stay in her yard in north Seattle. Every night, he would scratch at the back door or at one of Cantlon’s windows to be let in.

Then one day, he didn’t come back.

Cantlon didn’t see him for two weeks, then one day he returned with four squirrels. He disappeared again and returned one more time — on Thanksgiving Day.

“He came close, but he wouldn’t let me touch him,” Cantlon told The Seattle Times. “He just wanted me to know he was OK. He’s wild and free and happy and doing exactly what he’s supposed to be doing.”

Cantlon, who lives with her husband, Maqsood Ahmed, has cancer and said helping the animals is a healing activity.

“It’s therapeutic for me to be able to work with wildlife and be involved in saving the little lives of animals,” she said. “Animals have always been the love of my life, so to set them free and watch them fly and join their own kind, that’s what I get out of it.”

___

Information from: The Seattle Times, http://www.seattletimes.com

©2005 OregonLive.com. All Rights Reserved

Newspaper for newshounds

Newspaper for newshounds

Herald Sun: Newspaper for newshounds [21dec05]

Terry Brown
21dec05

BARKING mad newshounds? Scruffy staff? Snarling and bristling on deadline day? Nothing new there, but around Albury Wodonga, the Border Tail newspaper takes the biscuit.

It’s been digging up doggy scoops for nearly four years, since editor Robyn Flemming and her deputy editor – her pampered papillon Charlie – started it.
It was an offshoot of the local Dogs Breakfast Group, where 60 dogs and their well-trained humans had a free-for-all each month.

The “Dear Ruby” column gives advice on finding a Freddo frog, . . . and on canine shoe fetishes.

Interviews probe what really gets a dog hot under the collar.

“Charlie was interviewed in it once,” Robyn explains.

“She was asked who her dream date was – Brad Pit Bull!”

Dog horoscopes can be more practical than pooches prefer.

Aries dogs, for instance, are known to fight over females and the stars advise veterinary insurance and “early castration”.

There’s a Grumpy Old Dogs section, possibly featuring those unfortunate Arians.

The year’s last issue has new year’s resolutions for next year – the Chinese Year of the Dog.

Taz-man, a ridgeback-cross provided last year’s.

“He promised not to clean the new baby’s face with his tongue or to tear off the dog flap barreling through,” Robyn said.

About 300-odd dog families around Australia get the .

MP Malcolm Turnbull’s dogs Rusty, Jojo and Mellie have it emailed to them.

The paper raises money for Trish Smith’s Albury Dog Rescue, which saved 70 death-row dogs this year.

Mostly, though it gets people and dogs together.

“When there’s 50 to 60 dogs, it’s an amazing thing to see,” Robyn said.

You wouldn’t read about it – although your dog might.

© Herald and Weekly Times

Dogs bring health dose of affection to hospital

Dogs bring health dose of affection to hospital
Andrew Duddie gets a lick Monday from “Daisy Mae,” a black and white papillon breed dog, as part of a pet therapy program at Stamford Hospital. Healing Hounds, which started in 2001, provides “canine comfort and support” to patients and staff, according to the hospital.
Copyright © 2005, Southern Connecticut Newspapers, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Advocate – Dogs bring health dose of affection to hospital

By Christiana Sciaudone
Staff Writer

Published December 14 2005

STAMFORD — Borrowing Daisy May was the only brightness in Dorrie Plotnick’s day. She was undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer, which killed her sister and cousin.

“She brought me such joy,” said Plotnick of her neighbor’s black and white papillon breed dog.

Plotnick, of Norwalk, felt compelled to share the feeling. She discovered Healing Hounds, a program at Stamford Hospital, where she was treated.

Yesterday, about five weeks after the completion of her chemotherapy, Plotnick brought Daisy for her second visit to patients in the telemetry ward, where heart patients are monitored at the hospital.

Healing Hounds, which started in 2001, provides “canine comfort and support” to patients and staff, according to the hospital. Recently, UCLA researchers found that dog visits “helped heart and lung function by lowering pressures, diminishing release of harmful hormones and decreasing anxiety among hospitalized heart failure patients,” according to the American Heart Association.

Dana Neuman is a volunteer who heads the Stamford pet program. She started volunteering at the hospital with Oso, her 85-pound Bernese mountain dog, four years ago.

Oso — which means bear in Spanish — is a member of Therapy Dog International, a nonprofit volunteer group based in Flanders, N.J., that provides qualified handlers and dogs for visitations to institutions, facilities and other places. Dogs in the Stamford program aren’t required to have any certification. They just have to be polite, good with people and comfortable in a hospital, according to Neuman.

Not all qualify — two dogs Neuman auditioned simply were not interested — they kept running for the door.

Dogs visit about an hour a week and are assigned to various departments, often based on their owners’ preferences. If Neuman had her way, there would be two dogs a day in each of the five departments, seven days a week. Currently, 18 dogs with about 16 volunteers participate in the program.

Back at the third-floor telemetry unit, the hospital staff cooed around Oso, who settled comfortably down in the middle of the work station.

“Here’s my baby,” said nurse Janice Powers. “Where have you been?”

“Oso!” cried Eileen Elliott, the unit coordinator. “He’s back.”

Oso lay on his belly, face on the ground between his paws, and looked around him.

“Oh my goodness, isn’t he cute,” said nurse Romayne Yingling.

“You know I love you so much, silly boy,” Powers said, rubbing the dog.

Meanwhile, Daisy arrived for her second visit to the heart-monitoring unit.

The dog’s full name is Daisy Mae Hertz, and her great-grandfather won best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club in 1999, and her grandfather won best in breed in 2002 and 2003.

Plotnick, in all black and white to match the dog, wore cat-face earrings and a cat brooch, as well as Scottish terriers on her sweater. She accompanied Daisy, whom she borrows every Monday from her neighbor, dog trainer Helene Hertz.

“Oh, can my husband see him?” Anne Duddie asked Plotnick. Duddie’s husband was in a room at the end of the hall.

Plotnick, who has three cats at home, gladly obliged. Plotnick said she would love a papillon of Daisy’s line, and is waiting until she finds a job where she can bring a dog to work. Plotnick makes frames for the Labriola Frame & Art Gallery in Stamford.

Daisy pounced on Andrew Duddie’s bed and onto his chest.

“How are you doing?” he asked the dog.

Daisy pounced around and on Duddie — the benefit of weighing only four pounds — then hopped off and scampered across the hall.

“Daisy, come!” Plotnick cried.

Daisy quickly turned around and bounded back and onto Andrew Duddie’s bed once more.

“Grrrrrr, grrrrr,” Duddie, 80, teased the dog, scratching her with two hands.

The Duddies had a “Heinz 57,” a mutt, who died a while back. The couple never replaced the dog because it was too much to care for as they aged. Instead, they play with their daughters’ pets.

Daisy pranced up above Duddie’s pillow, and Anne Duddie leaned in for a quick lick. “Gimme some lovin’,” she asked of Daisy.

Copyright © 2005, Southern Connecticut Newspapers, Inc.

My Lady Ginger Spice … on a pillow

Lady Ginger Spice on a pillow

This is our dog Lady Ginger Spice. She is 6 months old and quite a little lady.

Submitted by: Jo Hubanks
November 18, 2005

Lady Ginger Spice

The Naples Dog Club papillons gave a free performance

The Naples Dog Club papillons gave a free performance
David Ahntholz/Staff

Valentino, dressed as a pilot, entertains the residents of Aston Gardens on Tuesday afternoon. The papillon was part of a free show at the North Naples retirement home presented by the Greater Naples Dog Club.


David Ahntholz/Staff

Theresa Keyser pets Hudson, dressed as an angel, during a break in the performance by the Greater Naples Dog Club at Aston Gardens on Tuesday afternoon. The papillons from the dog club gave a free performance and obedience demonstration for the residents of the North Naples retirement community.

Source: Naples Daily News: News

Performing pooches dazzle seniors

The Naples Dog Club papillons visit retirement/assisted-living homes, schools and other organizations free of charge to boost spirits and entertain. The chance to have the dogs socialize is also invaluable for their training

By JENNIFER BRANNOCK,
jabrannock@naplesnews.com
November 13, 2005

The hot, cramped community room at Aston Gardens’ assisted-living facility was packed to the brim with the listless faces of bored and distracted residents on a seem ingly ordinary Tuesday afternoon.

Several senior residents slumped in their chairs, seeming to be inches away from falling, while others stared blankly into space. Although the room was filled to capacity with about 50 neighbors, the crowd seemed to be engaged in a deep slumber.

That is, until Valentino strutted in. And Jewell. And Sassy.

As the talented troupe of pedigreed canine performers pawed delicately into the facility, residents’ eyes lit up at the sight of the gamboling dogs. Instantly, the drowsy crowd transformed into what looked like a group of schoolchildren bound for Disney World.

It’s not an uncommon metamorphosis for Arlene Czech, co-organizer of the traveling dog show for the Naples Dog Club.

The reaction is one she and her pack of pups have grown to expect and enjoy.

“Look at all the smiling faces,” Czech said, gesturing around the room. “When we first came in, they were all just sitting around, and we bring in the dogs and suddenly they’re ‘oooing’ and laughing.

“It’s tiring, but it’s worth it.”

Backstage jitters

“Sit, Jewell!” co-organizer Mary Jo Korpi called out. “You know how to sit.”

Jewell, a 2-year-old papillon and American Kennel Club champion, complied for a moment before resuming her jaunt around the bustling room.

The puppies, 7-month-olds Hudson and Cognac, growled playfully at each other and nipped at their bothersome costumes, while Savannah did an unscheduled dance on her hind legs.

Only 9-year-old Valentino sat quietly in costume, propped proudly on top of a wagon, as the chaos in the “dressing room” transpired.

Korpi equated the madness to preparation before any of the many dog shows she and Czech enter with the crew of papillon dogs, with one major exception.

“It’s hectic in the same way, but not as nerve-racking,” she said. “Here, the dogs are appreciated no matter what they do.

“If they mess up here, they get a laugh, but they have to be perfect at a show.”

The word “papillon” is French for “butterfly,” Czech explained.

The breed adopted the name, because the dogs’ wide, feathery ears resemble butterfly wings, she said.

The 5-pound, long-haired pups may look fragile, but they actually are quite active and love to play with people.

In the staging area adjacent to the community room, each of the dogs shivered like an actor with backstage jitters as they were dressed in their costumes.

But Czech said the dogs don’t suffer from stage fright; they are simply eager to interact with the crowd.

“They’re very excited,” she said. “This is fun for them.”

The performers come from three generations of papillon champions. Ten-year-old Savannah is the mother of Jewell, who is the mother of Hudson and Cognac.

Aside from the puppies, each of the dogs are champions in obedience and show — rated at the top of their game by the AKC.

One of the requirements set forth by the AKC for the Naples Dog Club is community service for both the dogs and their humans. But Korpi said the shows — often performed twice each month — are hardly a chore.

“It is really nice to see all of the faces of the people who come out for the show,” she said.

“Plus, this is also great for training and socialization of the dogs, so we get a lot out of it.”

Making new friends

Costume changes tend to take up time during any show. Dressing four-legged creatures can take even longer.

But the elated seniors at Aston Gardens hardly minded the breaks. Between skits, organist Virginia Reed prompted sing-alongs to old-fashioned tunes, such as “Shine on Harvest Moon” and “In the Good Ol’ Summertime.”

Residents tapped their feet, clapped their hands and sang loudly along with the tunes from their youth.

And just when they thought the afternoon couldn’t get better, out rolled Sassy and Valentino, dressed in cowboy and Indian costumes and riding a toy horse, followed by Savannah and Jewell decked out in sailors’ outfits.

“I love it!” Mary Thorngate, 89, called out. “They’re so cute. I love all of it.”

“I love dogs,” Audrey Gilbert, 89, agreed. “It is a good show.”

Thorngate continued to gush and giggle as Korpi placed a wriggling puppy in her lap. As the pup licked her nose and sat obediently on her lap, the senior, who strained to hear most of the show, called out to her friends and petted the grinning pooch.

“I hope they’ll come back,” she said.

Along with entertainment, residents also got a brief education about the dogs. While Czech explained the dogs’ names and in dividual talents, Korpi and the older dogs performed an obedience demonstration that wowed residents.

“They’ve got a good temperament, they love people and they’re very easy to train,” Czech said.

“Well, usually,” she added as Hudson refused to crawl through a mesh training tunnel.

Savannah’s owner, T.J. Danaher, of Naples, was on hand to help out with Tuesday’s show.

Since adopting the dog from Czech and Korpi several years ago, Danaher, a retired fashion photographer, has become very active in the community shows.

“When I adopted Savannah, I didn’t know at the time that she was a star and a champion,” he said. “Now, I love doing these shows. I love going to these places and helping people.”

The Naples Dog Club papillons visit retirement/ assisted-living homes, schools and other organizations free of charge to boost spirits and entertain. The chance to have the dogs socialize is also invaluable for their training, Korpi said.

“It’s a constant thing, training and socializing,” she said. “They have been doing it since they were 2 months old.”

Greg Vivino, activity coordinator for Aston Gardens’ assisted-living facility, used the show as an opportunity to socialize his residents as well. Bringing seniors out of their rooms to interact with others can be essential in keeping them healthy, he said.

“I thought it was great,” he said. “They all had smiles on their faces, and that’s what it’s all about.”

Copyright © 2005 Naples Daily News. All rights reserved.

Sara & Reggie celebrate their 1st Birthday


Sara & Reggie celebrate their 1st Birthday

1 st Birthday Celebration for Sara & Reggie

Bob & Icey Hagedorn
Central Coast California

http://webpages.charter.net/gascreek/gascreek

Submitted by Icey:
November 2, 2005

“Raffles” In Park


Raffles

This is a photo of Raffles in the park in Plano, Texas. He gets his name from the premier hotel in Singapore.

Sincerely,
Elena Turner

Submitted:
October 26, 2005

What a good Mommy I am!

Heads up from: http://freddiesblog.blogspot.com/2005/10/ruff-ruff-ruff-ruff_18.html

Source: The Seattle Times: Living: Got room for one more?

Got room for one more?

By Dean Rutz
Seattle Times staff photographer

For about as long as she can remember, Debby Cantlon says, friends and strangers have brought her animals in need: injured crows and blue herons, sick raccoons, all manner of critters needing nursing back to health.

So it wasn’t much of a surprise when someone Cantlon did not know called Sept. 6 to ask if she’d care for a newborn squirrel found at the base of a tree somewhere near Renton.

Cantlon, who lives with her husband, Maqsood Ahmed, in View Ridge, said the squirrel was probably no more than one week old; it had yet to open its eyes. The caller had found it near what he thought was its mother, dead, most likely from poisoning.

“Ninety-five percent of those animals that come to me, come to me battered and beaten and bruised,” Cantlon says, “nearly dead because people are so careless.”

So Cantlon took in the tiny creature and began caring for him. But this time, she found herself with an unlikely nurse’s aide: her pregnant Papillon, Mademoiselle Giselle, who actively encouraged the orphan to join her own litter, born Sept. 9.

For Cantlon, who has cancer, helping wounded animals is a healing activity. And in that spirit, she says, came the name she bestowed on the young squirrel, Finnegan: “As in, ‘Finnegan, begin again.’ ”

Dean Rutz: drutz@seattletimes.com

Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Photo gallery: Finnegan finds a family
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Finnegan was resting in a nest in a cage just days before Giselle was due to deliver her puppies. Cantlon and her husband watched as the dog dragged the squirrel’s cage — twice — to her own bedside before she gave birth. Cantlon was concerned, yet ultimately decided to allow the squirrel out — and the inter-species bonding began.

coverpic
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Finnegan was resting in a nest in a cage just days before Giselle was due to deliver her puppies. Cantlon and her husband watched as the dog dragged the squirrel’s cage — twice — to her own bedside before she gave birth. Cantlon was concerned, yet ultimately decided to allow the squirrel out — and the inter-species bonding began.


For about as long as she can remember, Debby Cantlon says, friends and strangers have brought her animals in need. So it wasn’t much of a surprise when someone asked her if she’d care for a newborn squirrel found at the base of a tree somewhere near Renton.


Debby Cantlon, who plans to release Finnegan, the young squirrel, back into the wild, bottle-fed the infant squirrel after it was brought to her house. Cantlon, who has cancer, says rescuing injured animals is therapeutic for her.


When Cantlon took in the tiny creature and began caring for him, she found herself with an unlikely nurse’s aide: her pregnant Papillon, Mademoiselle Giselle.


Finnegan was resting in a nest in a cage just days before Giselle was due to deliver her puppies


Cantlon and her husband watched as the dog dragged the squirrel’s cage — twice — to her own bedside before she gave birth.


Cantlon was concerned, yet ultimately decided to allow the squirrel out — and the inter-species bonding began.


Finnegan rides a puppy mosh pit of sorts, burrowing in for warmth after feeding, and eventually working his way beneath his new litter mates.


Two days after giving birth, mama dog Giselle allowed Finnegan to nurse; family photos and a videotape show her encouraging him to suckle alongside her litter of five pups.


Now, Finnegan mostly uses a bottle, but still snuggles with his “siblings” in a mosh pit of puppies, rolling atop their bodies and sinking in deeply for a nap.


Finnegan and his new litter mates, five Papillion puppies, get along together as if they were meant to.


Finnegan naps after feeding.


Finnegan makes himself at home with his new litter mates, nuzzling nose-to-nose for a nap after feeding.